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Posts Tagged ‘Myley Cyrus’

Several young friends, including some mothers, have written me to ask that I comment on the Myley Cyrus “scandal”. This involves the series of photos for Vanity Fair  for which the “Hannah Montana” star, beloved of way younger than pre-teens, posed recently.  Disney Productions, which has carefully cultivated and controlled the image of its money-making teen celebrity, is joining a chagrined Cyrus in blasting Vanity Fairand celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz. If you don’t know who she is, click here and you’ll see her  famous photo of John Lennon and Yoko Ono among many other classics.

Okay, here goes: First, Myley apparently thought the shot was artistic but now is upset because it’s in the public domain. Doesn’t she know – don’t her handlers know, for heaven’s sake, that everything about her is going to be in the public domain? And what, no one knows who the infamous photographer Annie Leibovitz is and what kind of pictures she takes and what kind of pictures Vanity Fair runs, which is to say, provocative and grownup?  Second, supposedly her dad, former country star Billy Ray Cyrus, had left the set after the all-too ubiquirtous daddy figure posed with daughter Myley in a shot (definitely click on this one) which creeped me out far more than a picture of the thin teen’s backbone, although her rumpled bed hair was over the top.  He looked like her, um, much older boyfriend. Now that’s provocative.

Second, I sourced this story by looking at two articles, from AP and from the Daily News article and the two pictures of 15-year-old Myley in her little dresses leave little to the imagination. She’s entitled because that’s how we market teens nowadays which is why this overkill reaction seems a tad hypocritical in the age of Britney Spears. The majority of high fashion models these days appear to be between fourteen and nineteen and are dressed to suggest activities beyond their “maturity level” (to paraphrase the title character in the hit movie “Juno” ). It may be out of control but it’s what we’ve all accepted.

Third, I thought it interesting that several articles referred to Myley’s fan base as being teens because I’ve seen girls in the 6-10-year-old range drooling over the cute teen as their slightly older sisters did with Hillary Duff, who’s gone to full-fledged vamp in less than a year. This is what pop culture is nowadays and expressing selective outrage, as the Disney Company did only because of the selective backlash from the mothers of tiny fans is about as hypocrtical as watching scantily dressed teens compete on “American Idol” and then voting one off because the song she sang, “Jesus Christ Superstar” was considered “blasphemous” by the voters.

While I continue to believe that our pop culture reflects the inconsistant and conflicted views we have about youth, puberty, sexuality and women in general, we’re the consumers and we’re the ones buying. The teen stars rule and everyone wants to imitate them, with middle-aged moms dressing up as if they were getting ready for prom night and little kids dressing up as if they were getting ready for wedding night.  Given all the real problems in the world, it’s laughable that so much outrage is expressed over something like this (then again, France is expressing similar outrage over its leather jacket wearing President and his sexy Italian model-wife). But our outrage has a shelf life. As with everything else, from global warming to government waste, we get excised, then we get over it.

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